Category Archives: Medical

Decreasing Summer Emergencies

Decrease Summer Emergencies By Staying Prepared

There are various types of emergency situations that tend to happen during the warm summer months. Whether it involves heat exhaustion, electricity blackouts, or dehydration, it is important to stay informed on things that you can do to protect yourself, your family and your pets. The summer heat can be dreadful for the elderly, young children, and people with serious health conditions. However, anyone who is exposed to the heat for a long period of time should be concerned about how the summer heat can have a negative effect on their health and everyday life.

Tips for Preventing Summer Emergencies

Summer emergencies can range from irritable to severe, however the good news is that they can be prevented. Here are a few things that we can all do to ensure safety this upcoming summer.

  • Avoid dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids even if you are not thirsty. Water is best, but any non-alcoholic beverage can help keep you hydrated on a hot summer day. (Tom adds: Not all non-alcoholic beverages are as helpful in staying hydrated as others. In addition to water; fruit juices, sports drinks, and clear beverages like flavored waters are the best options for maintaining hydration.)
  • Wear light colored, light weight clothing that is loose fitting if you plan on being outside for a long period of time
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  • Stay cool indoors by keeping the thermostat turned down or keeping doors closed if there is only one source of cool air in the home. If fans are used, place them in the windows or doorway to circulate cool air.
  • Always wear plenty of sunscreen when you plan on being exposed to the sun.
  • Exercising outdoors should be limited to the early morning or late evening hours when the temperature is at its lowest
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  • Visit your local county facilities that are air conditioned and open to the public if you need to cool down quickly such as the local library or community center.
  • Conserve energy inside your home so that you can help decrease the possibility of a community-wide blackout which could be dangerous for many people.

The Dangers of Hyperthermia

Hyperthermia is a term that is used to describe a variety of illnesses that occur due to overexposure to heat. The most common types of hyperthermia include heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Seniors and those with serious illnesses are most likely to develop this serious medical condition. Anyone who is showing signs of hyperthermia should seek immediate medical attention. While it is most common in the summer, hyperthermia can occur at any time to anyone. Individuals who take a lot of medication can be at a higher risk as well as young children and the elderly.

Avoid Blackouts by Conserving Energy

Warm temperatures outside mean higher electricity bills for most homeowners. While it is important to stay cool, it is also a good idea to keep an eye on your thermostat and try to keep it at a comfortable and conservative level. With so many people turning on energy-draining air conditioning systems it is highly likely for many communities to experience blackouts due to heat waves. When a blackout occurs, the power can go out and stay out for several hours. It is important to take precautions if you suspect that a blackout may occur such as keeping emergency food and water on hand so that you can stay hydrated. Stock up on food and snacks that do not require heating up and keep plenty of bottled water available.

Summer should be a fun and enjoyable time for all, unfortunately there are many areas where the high temperatures can make this happy time of year, a dreadful one for many people. Be sure to keep a close eye on at-risk individuals in your local community by checking in on elderly neighbors or those who are sick or disabled to see if they need assistance with staying cool. Many charity organizations provide free fans or window air conditioners for seniors or low-income families. By staying hydrated and avoiding long time exposure to the sun, you can help yourself beat the heat and make the summer season more enjoyable.

About The Author

Lee Flynn is a freelance writer and expert in emergency food preparedness and food storage.  

Coast Guard Rescue Swimmer Med Kit

There are a number of different missions that are carried out by the various branches of the federal government and military but one of the common denominators that makes a mission successful is good planning and support. One of the key support personnel for every mission is the medic, or in the case of the United States Coast Guard, the rescue swimmer. The mission of the rescue swimmer is to maintain proper training and conditioning to assist persons in distress in the maritime environment, including search and rescue operations and to provide pre-hospital life support to rescued individuals. The following is a list of the medical equipment that a rescue swimmer uses to help others survive disaster in the water.

Picture Credit: USCG.mil
U.S. Coast Guard Rescue Swimmer
Emergency Medical Equipment

The medical bag of choice for the U.S. Coast Guard is the Aeromed EMS Pack by Thomas Transport Packs.

Picture Credit: Thomas Transport Packs

Packed inside of the Aeromed Pack are these items in the mandatory configuration:

COMPARTMENT 1 - Outside:

  • Blood Pressure Cuff
  • Stethoscope
  • Pen Light
  • Latex Gloves
  • Scissors
COMPARTMENT 2 - Outside:
  • SAM Splint
COMPARTMENT 3 - Outside:
  • Airway Kit, Oropharyngeal
  • Airway Kit, Nasalpharyngeal
  • Pocket Mask
COMPARTMENT 4:
  • Ace Wrap

COMPARTMENT 5:

  • Band-Aid, Adhesive
  • Charcoal, Activated
  • Glucose, Oral
  • Syrup of Ipecac
  • Bulb Syringe
  • Cord Clamps
  • Umbilical Tape
COMPARTMENT A Inside:
  • Battle Dressing, Small
  • Battle Dressing, Med.
  • Battle Dressing, Large
COMPARTMENT B Inside:
  • Bandage, Gauze
  • Water Gel, Burn Kit
  • Petroleum Gauze
  • Sponges, Surgical, 4×4
COMPARTMENT C Inside:
  • Cravat, Bandage
COMPARTMENT D Inside:
  • Plastic Bag
  • Adhesive, Tape, 2″
  • Adhesive, Tape, 1
INNER COMPARTMENT
Inside: Collar, Cervical - No-Neck, Small, Medium, Large - 1 of Each
INNER COMPARTMENT E, F, & G:
  • Band-Aid
  • Thermometer 94-108F and/or Electronic Ear Canal Thermometer
  • Ball Point Pen

In addition to the medical bag, the following items make up the remainder of the rescue swimmer emergency medical kit located on board the helicopter:

  • Bag-Valve Mask by Life Support Products
  • Resuscitator, Oxygen by Life Support Products
  • Laerdal Suction Kit V-Vac by Dyna Med Inc.
  • Cylinder, Oxygen “D” Size M-22 by Life Support Products
  • Antishock Trousers
  • Traction Splint
  • Cervical Collars
  • Medevac Board by Lifesaving Systems Corp.
  • Medevac Report Form (CG-5214)
  • Victims/Casualty Hypothermia Bag by Wiggy’s Inc.
  • Automatic External Defibrillator (AED): Heartstream Forerunner Model E01 including Semi-Rigid Carrying Case, DP5 Extra Pads, Data Card (30 Mins. ECG & Event) and BT1 Battery Pack
  • Current EMT Text (Currently used by USCG EMT School)

Reference: Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue Swimmer Manual, COMDTINST M3710.4B, 28 JUL 00

Fighting an Invisible Enemy

The following post is a guest contribution and highlights a little discussed area of emergency preparedness.

Chemical and Biological Warfare: Fighting an Invisible Enemy

The news story first popped up a few days ago: a mysterious, deadly illness that doctors haven’t been able to diagnose. All of the sudden, it’s everywhere, and the mortality rate is scary. Grocery stores are empty. Families lock themselves in their homes. Schools are shuttered. Once doctors and law enforcement officers get sick, society starts crumbling. Only one thing could make the scenario more frightening: that somebody did it intentionally.

There’s something about biological warfare – and its cousin, chemical warfare – that resonates with our most primitive fears about the enemy we don’t see coming. Everyday objects and even the very air we breathe suddenly seem dangerous. Even worse, once the genie is out of the bottle, there’s no putting it back in. It’s uncontrollable and, in the case of biological warfare, often self-perpetuating.

World governing bodies like the United Nations and NATO have condemned the use of such weapons, but that doesn’t mean rogue nations and terrorists won’t use them anyway. That’s why it’s so important for both governments and individuals to know how to be prepared and what to do.

Detection and Response

The World Health Organization (WHO) formed an early warning system dedicated to monitoring and reacting to suspicious outbreaks. The Global Outbreak Alert and Response network links more than 70 worldwide sources of information on rising health issues. Trained teams are ready to deploy within 24 hours. They’re tasked with identifying the chemical or biological agent and forming an appropriate response.

The U.S. military has developed a number of detection systems, from miniature labs that travel around on Humvees to multi-sensor arrays monitored from ships. And they’re constantly working to improve their methods of containment, decontamination, and treatment. In addition, since some chemical and biological weapons can be delivered with bombs or missiles, explosive detectors play a big role in the monitoring process.

In the event of an attack, doctors, nurses, and other first responders would be instrumental in sounding the alarm. All states have a list of “immediately reportable” diseases that have to be reported to the local health department. That means that even one case of a disease like smallpox is enough to mobilize a response. And, since some engineered weapons may not be easily diagnosable, doctors are also trained to report unusual clusters of illness. If an ER is suddenly flooded with people sick with an illness doctors can’t diagnose, they would immediately get the health department involved. They’d also be responsible for isolation and containment, including requiring all medical personnel to wear protective equipment.

What You Can Do

  1. The first line of defense is preparation. You should already have an emergency kit in case of an earthquake or other natural disaster. Make sure that kit also has gloves, plenty of soap, bleach, duct tape, and surgical masks.
  2. Have enough food and water to last for several days. In case of a biological attack with a contagious agent, isolation is key. You don’t want to have to go out in public to buy supplies.
  3. Identify a safe room in your home. It should be an interior room with few windows and, if possible, located on an upper floor. (Most biological and chemical agents are heavy enough to sink to the ground, so being higher may offer some protection.)  

Here are some tips on what to do if an attack actually happens:

  • Monitor the news for official information and instructions. Computers and smart devices are great, but in a worst-case scenario, they could lose power before the crisis is over. Make sure your emergency kit contains a battery-operated radio.
  • If you’re out in public, cover your nose and mouth with a shirt or scarf. Leave the area if you can, heading upwind.
  • If you’re home, grab your emergency kit and head for your safe room. Turn off all ventilation (heating, AC, etc.) systems and close the windows. Then use duct tape to seal the windows and doors as best as you can.

You’ll probably never have to use this information. But once you need it, it’s too late to go looking for it. Educate yourself on chemical and biological warfare so that if the worst occurs, you’ll be able to react right away.

About The Author

Jeremy S. is a self-confessed tech geek of several years. An avid blogger, you can read his informative articles on technology and various other blog sites.

Bombing Anniversary Serves As Reminder

Today marks the first anniversary of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. I think that it is important to remember the victims of this tragic and cowardly attack, but I feel that it should also serve as a reminder of the importance to be prepared. There are several of the victims that were wounded when the bombs went off that had their lives saved as a result of the quick thinking of the bystanders and first responders, accompanied by the ability of the same to improvise and apply effective tourniquets made of clothing and belts.

This is not an isolated incident either. The high profile shooting spree by Jared Loughner that resulted in Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords being shot in the head is another case where tourniquets and hemostatic agents, that were in the Law Enforcement medical kits carried by officers, are credited with saving the lives of the injured.

These kits are modeled off of TCCC or TC3 (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) which is based off of combat experiences and the most likely threats to the injured. One of the single greatest lessons learned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is the safe use of tourniquets and the effectiveness of pressure bandages and hemostatic agents in stopping bleeding. This has led to law enforcement agencies and emergency medical responders being issued these same tools to use in their daily duties. The tourniquet was previously considered a last resort is now recognized as the primary tool to stop arterial bleeding on an extremity. John Cohen, senior counterterrorism official at the Department of Homeland Security stated in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing last year that, “As we began to take a hard look at how to respond to these types of incidents, what became clear was that the sooner you can stop victims from bleeding, the higher likelihood you will have for reducing fatalities, and the things that make the biggest difference in stopping bleeding are tourniquets and other bandages.” Findings like this have led to other initiatives across the United States that would make tourniquets and other lifesaving equipment available in public places like shopping malls and schools, where they could be employed by trained personnel or even the public if the need were to arise.

For preparedness minded individuals, this begs the question of, shouldn’t we do the same thing? The answer is an emphatic, yes! When making medical preparations, it is important to prepare first for the most likely scenario that will occur. For most of us, the primary threat to our health is some sort of accident. Because of this probability, a medical kit with a high quality tourniquet, pressure dressings, and hemostatic agent is an absolute must.

As a prepper, not only should medical kits be present in the home, but in the car, boat, RV, ATV, and range bag to name a few potential placements. This is because no one knows exactly when things could go wrong. It could be a mass shooting, there could be an accident at the gun range, or even an accident with a chainsaw while trying to fell a tree. These are all likely incidents that could require these particular medical supplies for proper treatment of the injuries.

My recommendation for a tourniquet would be the SOF Tourniquet accompanied by the Israeli Bandage or ETD (Emergency Trauma Dressing) for a pressure dressing and QuikClot Advanced Clotting Sponge hemostatic agent for an easy to use addition to your basic medical kit.

Regardless of the chosen supplies, what counts the most is having your medical kit put together and ready to use at a moments notice.

To see just how common incidents are where tourniquets and hemostatic agents are employed, look at this list of Law Enforcement Officer of Tactical EMS/Tactical Combat Casualty Care practices in action.

Bandages, BOB’s & Bullets

Today I had the opportunity to spend some time with Dale and his wife Lisa over at the Survivalist Prepper Podcast about some of the basics of preparedness. I had a great time visiting with them and enjoyed the opportunity to discuss my military experience, first aid, bug out bags, and some self defense options.

There are a couple of things that you should check out over at the Survivalist Prepper:

  1. I guess it might be obvious but, the interview I just did.
  2. For about another week, Dale is running a giveaway for a Bug Out Bag loaded with some great gear. Make sure to get entered to win.
  3. Finally, on the 9th of May I will be joining Dale, along with Todd from PrepperWebsite, JD from Conflicted (The Game), and Vincent from Disaster Survival Magazine for a webinar on preparedness basics. It should be a great time! You can register for the webinar using the form at the top of the Survivalist Prepper homepage.

I have to make a personal confession in the fact that Dale’s podcast has probably become my favorite survival and preparedness related podcast. I have listened to almost every episode, even the one I am featured in (just to make sure I didn’t say anything too embarrassing)! With that being said, I don’t think you will be disappointed if you take the time to listen to what Dale has to say.

My Interview With Poor Man Prepper

Yesterday I had the opportunity to do an interview with Lat Cozad of the Poor Man Prepper Podcast. I had a great time and enjoyed getting to speak with Lat about medical preparedness, my time in the military, and a little bit about preparedness in general. If you are interested in listening to the interview and hearing what I have to say, check out Episode 528 of the Poor Man Prepper Podcast.

Medical Kit Purchase Opportunity

I have recently had some individuals express interest in possibly coming together as a community and putting a group buy together for a medical emergency response kit. After doing some research and sketching out a plan, this is what I have come up with:

  1. The requirement for making the purchase happen will be to determine that there is enough interest.
  2. Payment will have to be received up front. Unfortunately, as much as I would like to, I cannot afford to finance this project alone. 
  3. From what I have been able to source, here is what the kit will look like:

Trauma Response Kit – $150 + Shipping (U.S. Domestic Flat Rate is less than $20)

Airway/Breathing

  • HALO Occlusive Chest Seal (2 Per Package) – 1 Each

Bleeding/Circulation

  • SOF Tactical Tourniquet – 1 Each
  • Emergency Trauma Dressing (6”) – 2 Each
  • QuikClot (25G) – 2 Each

Splint/Disability

  • ACE Wrap (6”) – 1 Each
  • SAM Splint, Flat (4.25” x 36”) – 1 Each
  • Cravat (Triangular Bandage) – 1 Each

Wound Care

  • Slip Tip Syringe (10 cc) – 1 Each
  • Steri-Strips Adhesive Skin Closure (1/8” x 3”, 5 Per Package) – 1 Each
  • Stretch Roller Gauze, Sterile (4”) – 1 Each
  • 2 x 2 Gauze Pads, Sterile – 10 Each
  • 4 x 4 Gauze Pads, Sterile – 5 Each
  • Adhesive Bandage (3/8” x 1.5”) – 6 Each
  • Adhesive Bandage (3/4” x 3”) – 8 Each
  • Adhesive Bandage (1” x 3”) – 8 Each
  • Adhesive Bandage (2” x 4.5”) – 4 Each

Miscellaneous

  • Black Nitrile Exam Gloves, Large – 5 Pair
  • Cloth Medical Tape (1”) – 1 Roll
  • Alcohol Pads – 10 Each
  • Trauma Shears – 1 Each
  • Moleskin (3” x 5”) – 1 Sheet
  • Casualty Space Blanket – 1 Each
  • Splinter Forcep – 1 Each
  • Cyalume Light Stick – 2 Each

OTC Medications

  • Antibiotic Ointment (.9GR Foil Pack) – 5 Each
  • Extra-Strength Acetaminophen (2 Pack) – 5 Each
  • Ibuprofen (2 Pack) – 5 Each
  • Antacid (2 Pack) – 5 Each
  • Antidiarrheal – 5 Each
  • Hydrocortisone Cream (.9GR Foil Pack) – 5 Each
  • Electrolyte Tablets (2 Pack) – 5 Each
  • Cold & Cough (2 Pack) – 5 Each
Please let me know if this is an opportunity that you are interested in pursuing or if you have any additional questions by emailing me at tom@thepreparedninja.com.

7 More Awesome Medical/Tactical Bags!

Last week I wrote about the only medical bag that you will ever need to buy. Today I wanted to highlight a few more medical bags that are highly suited for preppers, search and rescue, tactical medics, military medics, or any person that is interested in having a durable medical kit. These bags all exhibit great function, durability, quality of materials and craftmanship, and suitability for austere conditions. I listed them in my order of preference from most preferred to last preferred.

Blackhawk S.T.O.M.P. II

1. Tactical Tailor M5 Medic Pack - I still have my Tactical Tailor M5 bag. It is an awesome bag, but doesn’t hold the most gear compared to some of the other bags. What it lacks in size, it makes up for in versatility. It is a well constructed bag that I used on my last deployment. The best part of all is that Tactical Tailor stands behind their work. If you ever have a problem with your gear, it can be sent back to be repaired or replaced. One of the unique features of the M5 bag is that the inside is configurable. The internal dividers are held in with hook and loop tape that is strong and well suited for the task. As a result of the almost endless configurations for this bag, it can be adapted to be used as a general medical bag or even for other applications. The outside of the bag has MOLLE webbing on three sides which allows for additional storage in the form of removable pockets.

2. Blackhawk S.T.O.M.P. II Medical Pack - One good look at this bag and it will be apparent that it is almost identical to the London Bridge Training Coverage Medical Bag. The great thing about that is the London Bridge bag is very well designed. Perhaps even better than that is the fact that the Blackhawk bag is significantly less when it comes to the purchase price. The big downside to this bag is that it is cheaper in the way that it is put together. It is still suitable for a combat environment but may not hold up for quite as many years as some other bags.

3. TSSi TACOPS M9 Assault Medical Backpack - When this bag was introduced it became the go to bag for many special operations forces in the Middle East. It is a small bag but it fits so nicely atop a set of body armor that it can almost be forgotten about. This makes it ideal for wearing in vehicles and transitioning from aircraft which led to it’s popularity. The outside of the bag also features webbing that allows the addition of external pockets. It is also capable of carrying everything required to save a life from a traumatic injury in the field.

4. StatPacks Stealth - StatPacks is a company that has established itself in the fire and EMS community for their medical bags. In recent years, StatPacks has realized that many of their products, if properly colored, could be adapted for use in a tactical setting. This has lead to the adoption of StatPacks products for use not only in the military but in police agencies as well. The Stealth is modular for maximum versatility, includes space for a hydration bladder, and features webbing for the addition of external pouches.

One of the most important aspects of deciding which bag is best for you is the size of the bag. A good basic rule with medical bags, and any bag for that matter, is to gather all of the items that you intend to pack into it and see what size bag that you need. Whatever you do, don’t get a bag that is too big. I am not a fan of large bags. In the Army, we called them “tick” bags, referring to the fact that you could fill them until they were about to explode and looked like a tick. Overloading a bag can be a nightmare. The last thing you want to do is haul around ten extra pounds of gear that you don’t need. With that being said, it can be even worse to have someone’s life in your hands and not have the stuff to save them. Packing a medical bag is a delicate balance and you must determine what will most suit your needs for the task at hand.

Alternatives to a purpose built medical bag should also be considered. There are many awesome bags out there that I would readily use for my gear. My top 3 alternative bags to use for a medical kit would be:

1. Kifaru International Marauder - Kifaru is another great company that puts out a product that speaks for itself. Well, not literally speaking for itself but one look at the bag and you will know that it is top notch. The Marauder is a versatile pack that can be used for anything that you can imagine.

2. 5.11 Tactical RUSH MOAB10 - This is a great bag for a smaller kit. Check out my recent review of the MOAB 10.

3. GoRuck GR1 - The guys at GoRuck are sticklers for quality and all of their bags are made in the United States. These bags are relied on by a number of U.S. Special Operations forces for duty across the globe as well as for personal use.

In the event that a duty grade bag is not an option for you because of budget, practicality or another reason, don’t let it stop you from putting a high quality kit together. I have seen some great kits that were put together using tackle boxes, a plastic tote, and even a tool box. Rule number one should be to have a kit. Once you have something together, it can be improved going forward. There is no replacement for a purpose-built medical bag though. In the event of an emergency, a durable bag that is designed to keep life-saving supplies neat and organized can make all the difference.

The Only Medical Bag You Will Ever Have To Buy

One of the major components of being a prepper is having a plan in place in the event someone needs medical treatment. All the planning in the world is no good without a kit, and the world’s best kit is useless without a bag to get it around in. I am fortunate in that I have had extensive military experience as an Army combat medic, so I have been able to use and abuse many medical kits and bags. This is especially true during the time I spent in combat. There is one bag though, that saw me through all of my combat deployments.

Photo Credit: London Bridge Trading Company

I had the same London Bridge Trading (LBT) Training Coverage Medical Bag for all three of the combat tours that I did in Iraq. As a medic this was an irreplaceable asset to me and led to dozens of lives being saved. No matter where we went or what we did, I had my aid bag with me, ready to go to work. This combat proven bag is structured to be most effective when needed in times of life or death. The two main compartments are clearly organized and allow quick access to all your medical supplies. 

The second to none LBT bag is well designed and put together with unmatched craftsmanship. Not only is the design flexible enough to work with a variety of clothing and uniforms, it will also fit comfortably with body armor and without. The craftsmanship features padded shoulder straps, double stitching and bar-tacked seams, nylon bonded thread, and grommet reinforced drain holes in every pocket. When comparing these design features to similar bags, it will quickly become clear that the LBT products are echelons above the other products in the marketplace. Other features of the London Bridge Trading Company Training Coverage Medical Bag include:

  • Overall Dimensions: 21L x 14.5W x 5.2H
  • Main Compartment Measures 14L x 8W x 20H
  • Main Compartment Pocket For Removable Padded Drug Bag (12L x 3.5W x 7H)
  • Main Compartment Pocket For Removable Airway Kit Bag (12L x 4.5W x 7H)
  • Interior Mesh Pocket With Draw Closure (For 3000cc Injectables) Within Main Compartment
  • Main Compartment Has Zippered Mesh Pockets (12L x 6H) and 3 Cinch Straps For Bulky Items
  • Splint Pocket and Pocket For Hydration Bladder Inside Main Compartment
  • 2 Sliders On All Zippered Compartments
  • Heavy-Duty Carry Handle
  • Side Pockets For EMT Shears & Mini-Mag Light
  • Weight: 7.1 Lbs 
Photo Credit: London Bridge Trading Company

I would say that there are a few disadvantages of this particular pack. The single greatest downside to the training coverage medical pack is the price. At a retail price of $569.59, it is very expensive! It is also limited in the colors that it is available in. The stock colors are all tactical in design making it difficult to use in a covert manner, AKA the “grey man” approach to survival.

So why is this the only medical bag you will ever have to buy? I believe that it is so well-built that you won’t ever have to replace it. And if my opinion isn’t good enough, even if you do manage to beat it up, London Bridge Trading stands behind their products with a lifetime warranty. They will repair or replace their products for issues that are a result of manufacturing or materials defects.

Because what we pay for, is typically what we get, I would advocate for one quality product that will last a lifetime instead of spending more in the end to buy an inferior product and replace it five times. How will you meet the medical needs of you and yours if things go bad?

Press Release: Ready To Go Survival Announces New Addition

Prepared Ninja supporter Ready to Go Survival has officially released the latest product in their growing line of survival gear.

Ready To Go Survival Announces New Addition to Growing Product Line

NEW YORK, NY: August 12th, 2013Ready to Go Survival, a NYC based e-commerce start-up specializing in disaster preparedness, today announced a new addition to their product line, the Ready to Go Survival Hygiene Kit. The Hygiene Kit represent another critical addition to the already popular Survival Kits, which boast clever names such as the Tactical Traveler and Advanced Operative.

“When the average American thinks of what they’ll need in a survival situation, hygiene tends to be last on many people’s priority list, but this oversight could be deadly, ” said co-founder Fabian Illanes. “In a real survival situation, most likely you will not have the things most of us take for granted everyday; toothpaste, deodorant, even toilets themselves may not be available. You may not think this is a big deal for a day or two, but imagine weeks of not having a toilet or shower? A lack of proper hygiene could turn into real medical problems and in a survival situation you may not have the medicine or resources to be able to treat once a problem happens. The only way to prevent those problems is to take hygiene seriously, which is why we created the Hygiene Kit, a small pouch of everyday hygiene items that could actually end up saving your life.”

According to the United Nations Development Programme, the water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns.

“In a world where millions die each year from water, sanitation, and hygiene-related causes, it is crucial that we take hygiene seriously when it comes to prepping for disaster situations,” added co-founder Roman Zrazhevskiy. “While America may not suffer from the same sanitation and hygiene issues that some less developed countries suffer from on a daily basis, in a disaster situation you have to be prepared for anything. If it’s a proven fact that a lack of proper hygiene can lead to diseases and death, why wouldn’t you prepare just like you would for anything else that can lead to death? And at the very least, having a proper hygiene kit during a survival situation can improve morale and comfort, and a positive morale has many benefits during a survival situation.”

The Hygiene Kit that Ready to Go Survival offers includes common household hygiene items such as toilet paper, bug spray, soap, toothpaste, disposable razors and even a nail clipper all conveniently packed into a 5.11 6×6 pouch.

New Article on Personal Liberty Digest

There is one absolute truth when it comes to traumatic injuries…all bleeding eventually stops. That also happens to be the title of my latest article on Personal Liberty Digest. If time allows, head on over and check it out.

Special Operations Forces-Tourniquet (SOF-T)

Pack A Kit And Save A Life

There is a new article up on Personal Liberty Digest that I authored about blow out kits. The article covers what a blow out kit (BOK) is, why you need one, and what to put in it. Check it out and if you have any suggestions or remarks please leave a comment. Click on the picture below to go straight to the article.

There is also a great article on the breakdown of justice in America.

Your Doctor…Friend or Foe?

Everyone hopes that when they visit the doctor that they leave in a better state then when they arrived or at least have a plan to achieve a condition of better health. This is a reasonable expectation. It is also expected that conversations between a healthcare provider and their patient will be held in confidence as guaranteed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. I understand the medical necessity to inquire about certain social habits. The amount of alcohol that a patient consumes or tobacco that they use can have a direct impact on their health and could even be the exact cause for certain medical problems. No one expects that their physician will be a spy for the government and have an agenda outside of the patients chief complaint.

This is exactly what some of the 23 Executive Actions that President Obama signed into law will see to if the President has his way. Let me be clear, my doctor asking me about whether I own firearms or not is not going to have even the slightest impact on what is causing my chronic cough. This is a separate issue from those suffering from mental illness. If there is a patient that presents with mental illness and verbalizes threats or acts in a threatening manner it presents a different set of circumstances and at that point it seems prudent that the doctor may incur an obligation to report a credible threat. What the recent Executive Actions are encouraging include:

1. Protect the rights of health care providers to talk to their patients about gun safety: Doctors and other health care providers also need to be able to ask about firearms in their patients’ homes and safe storage of those firearms, especially if their patients show signs of certain mental illnesses or if they have a young child or mentally ill family member at home. Some have incorrectly claimed that language in the Affordable Care Act prohibits doctors from asking their patients about guns and gun safety. Medical groups also continue to fight against state laws attempting to ban doctors from asking these questions. The Administration will issue guidance clarifying that the Affordable Care Act does not prohibit or otherwise regulate communication between doctors and patients, including about firearms.

2. Address unnecessary legal barriers, particularly relating to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, that may prevent states from making information available to the background check system.

3. Improve incentives for states to share information with the background check system.

4. Direct the Attorney General to review categories of individuals prohibited from having a gun to make sure dangerous people are not slipping through the cracks.

What seems likely to result from this in my opinion:

1. Physicians, Medical Groups, Hospitals, etc. will start to implement gun owner questionnaires into their patient screening processes. Further down the road, ObamaCare funding could even be limited based on inclusion of this questioning during patient visits. This leaves patients in the predicament of either answering questions unwillingly or being forced to lie to their healthcare providers to protect their individual freedoms that are supposed to be guaranteed by the Constitution.

2. There are not currently any “unnecessary legal barriers” in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. The President wants your medical information to be disclosed when you want to purchase a firearm. The HIPAA laws state that:

  • Health providers and health plans, INCLUDING government programs that pay for health care must comply with HIPAA laws.
  • The information protected includes information health care providers put in your medical record, conversations your doctor has about your health care with others, information about you in your health insurer’s computer system, billing information about you at your clinic, and most other health information about you held by those who must follow these laws.
  • Covered entities must put in place safeguards to protect your health information and must reasonably limit uses and disclosures to the minimum necessary to accomplish their intended purpose.
  • The HIPAA Privacy Rule sets rules and limits on who can look at and receive your health information. To make sure that your health information is protected in a way that does not interfere with your health care, your information can be used and shared:
  1. For your treatment and care coordination.
  2. To pay doctors and hospitals for your health care and to help run their businesses.
  3. With your family, relatives, friends, or others you identify who are involved with your health care or your health care bills, unless you object.
  4. To make sure doctors give good care and nursing homes are clean and safe.
  5. To protect the public’s health, such as by reporting when the flu is in your area.
  6. To make required reports to the police, such as reporting gunshot wounds.
  • Your health information cannot be used or shared without your written permission unless this law allows it. For example, without your authorization, your provider generally cannot:
  1. Give your information to your employer.
  2. Use or share your information for marketing or advertising purposes.
  3. Share private notes about your health care.

Seems like a whole bunch of reasons to not share your medical information when you go to purchase a firearm.

3. Uncle Sugar, uh I mean Uncle Sam is going to offer a lot of money to states that are willing to do what he wants!

4. The AG will look at who else might be a good candidate to ban from owning guns. Maybe so that felons and those with convictions for domestic violence don’t feel so alone, military veterans and those who speak out about individual liberty and freedom will likely be added to the list of those who cannot possess a firearm.

I wouldn’t go so far as being paranoid but at the same time I would not make it a habit to tell your life story to the dude that you just met at the bus stop. At least take the time and consider if the questions that your doctor is asking you are actually pertinent to your medical care and if your healthcare provider is on your side.

Don’t worry…now that our doctors are against us, our kids will be next.

Friday Survival Scoop

Another week has come to an end and that means another round of the latest and greatest survival and disaster preparedness offerings that are available on the web. This week we have insight into the seven packaged foods you won’t have to buy again, choosing where to bug-in, the regular guy strategy, and medical preparations for your family.

The Nickel Pincher: 7 Packaged Foods You Never Need to Buy Again by Jean Nick from Rodale

This is a great article about seven store packaged foods that most families or individuals buy at that store that can also be made easily and affordably at home. The seven foods include crackers, corn tortillas, chips, yogurt, mayo/salad dressings, energy bars, and soda. The article also points out that by making these foods on your own, you can lose weight, save money, reduce the amount of packaging used, and also consume fewer chemicals when eating the same foods.

Bugging-In; Choose Your Location Wisely by Butch C. from Prep-Blog

Butch from the Prep-Blog gives additional thought in this post to his plan to bug-in in the event of a disaster. There is emphasis given to specific areas to consider when planning to stay put versus deciding to leave in a disaster. The specific areas to evaluate include:

  • Natural disasters that could occur in the area.
  • Man-made disasters that are possible in the area.
  • The distance of your location from any major towns or cities.
These are all serious considerations to keep in mind. More in-depth information can be obtained from reading the article.

The Regular Guy Strategy: Escaping Prepper Prison from SurvivalSherpa

The SurvivalSherpa does a great job of outlining the fact that sometimes being a prepper can feel a lot like being in prison. Why you ask? Because if you don’t keep what you are doing quiet you could get labeled a weirdo by your friends or even worse, a “homegrown” terrorist by your government. The Sherpa talks about building community, developing regular guy skills, and to prioritize tasks like a regular guy which allows the reader to look at prepping tasks from a basic perspective.

Medical Prepping in Three Months: A Guide to Safeguarding Your Family — Part 1 of 2 by Dr. Cynthia J. Koelker from SurvivalBlog

While this is only part one of a two-part series, this article is packed with information on how to medically prepare your family, group, community medically over a three-month period. The concepts contained include everything from establishing a means of keeping medical records all the way to identifying different rashes. Medical needs are addressed not only from direct patient care but also from learning the skills needed to treat patients as well as building community, medical resources, and preventive medicine. Because this is part one of two it covers weeks one through six of the three-month plan but will still provide you plenty of “food” for thought to help get you medically prepared for the worst.

What survival or preparedness articles caught your eye around the web this week?

Dealing With Overuse Injuries

Overuse injuries are a common threat to a great number of people across the globe every year. It is estimated that in athletes alone, approximately 10 percent of participants suffer annually from an overuse injury. Don’t be mistaken either, athletes are not alone in this realm of suffering. Overuse injuries can occur from sports and recreational activities, occupational hazards, household chores, or any tasks that are performed repetitively. So what does this have to do with prepping? There is a fairly widespread feeling amongst preppers to learn new skills, get into better shape, do this thing or that thing better, or make up of what others are not doing. This can lead to overuse injuries!

What Causes Overuse Injuries?

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine provides a very clear and easy to understand definition of the cause of overuse injuries,

The human body has a tremendous capacity to adapt to physical stress. In fact, many positive changes occur as a result of this. With exercise and activity, bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments get stronger and more functional. This happens because of an internal process called remodeling. The remodeling process involves both the break down and build up of tissue. There is a fine balance between the two and if break down occurs more rapidly than build up, injury occurs.

When these injuries occur it can be a result of starting a new activity and trying to do too much, too soon. An example would be relocating from an urban environment to a rural location having never split firewood before and deciding to split an entire tree’s worth of wood in one day. This would likely be too much, too soon and could lead to an overuse injury because your body is not used to this activity and your body would not be able to fully recover from this activity. Undertaking a new activity and using a poor technique can also lead to injury.

Other risk factors that can lead to overuse injuries include previous injuries, making up for lost time after taking a break from an activity, poor form, using improper or broken equipment, differences in work surfaces (hard vs. soft), and anatomical factors such as flat feet or unequal leg lengths.

Preventing Overuse Injuries

As the saying goes…an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. With that being said, prevention can come in a number of ways. Someone with experience/expertise that can offer assistance in proper technique will be invaluable in helping prevent injury. Taking the time to stretch and properly warm-up prior to starting any activity is also helpful. Another prevention technique is the ten percent rule which essentially equates to not adding more than 10 percent to any activity or training program per week to avoid injury. An example of the ten percent rule is a runner not adding more than 10% to their total distance as compared to the week before. This can prevent overuse injuries like shin splints for the runner.

Diagnosing Overuse Injuries

There is only one way to get diagnosed with an overuse injury. *See a healthcare provider. There is not any equivalent to this option. Not every overuse injury requires an elaborate set of tests to be diagnosed but there is no substitution for the expertise of a physician. With that being said, there are ways to treat your symptoms if you are not able to immediately seek medical care for some reason.

Treating Overuse Injuries

One of the primary methods of treatment for overuse injuries is either rest or an easy/hard approach where a combination of easy and hard activities are facilitate continued activity and maintenance of overall fitness while individual injuries recover. These practices can be especially useful in treating the early symptoms of overuse injuries. R.I.C.E. is another useful tool in treating overuse injuries to the extremities, especially those that involve swelling. The acronym R.I.C.E. stands for:

  • Rest – Rest to prevent further injury.
  • Ice – Ice the area to help prevent swelling.
  • Compression – Use an ACE wrap to provide compression.
  • Elevation – Elevate the injured extremity will also reduce swelling.

Pain can also be a particularly bothersome symptom which be alleviated by aspirin or anti-inflammatory medications. By the way…pain is usually the body’s way of saying slow down a little.

How do you prevent overuse injuries? Leave a comment and let us know how.

*DISCLAIMER – The author is not a physician and the information and opinions expressed in this article are not in any way a substitution for the treatment and advice of a licensed medical provider. The information, views, and opinions expressed in the article are provided for informational purposes only and should be used at the readers risk.

Source: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

Eat Your Way Free Of Inflammation

Life can be tough. Sometimes at the end of the day I am left feeling like I got hit by a freight train. Other days I go to bed feeling fine but wake up to find that the train came in my sleep. Modern medicine often uses medications to take care of aches, pains, swelling, and other feelings of discomfort that occur in the body. If it all hits the fan and medications are not available how do you plan on treating these same symptoms?

Last week, Dr. Mehmet Oz featured an anti-inflammation diet on his show that was developed by Dr. Andrew Weil who is an innovator in holistic medicine. The development of this specific diet was in support of Dr. Weil’s conviction that many serious and chronic disease processes are caused from inflammation in the body. The following excerpt about inflammation comes from Dr. Oz himself,

Most people are familiar with inflammation that appears on the body’s surface in the form of redness, heat, swelling and pain. Inflammation is how the body heals itself, bringing more immune activity to a site of injury or infection. However, when inflammation persists or gets out of control, it can damage the body.

While stress, lack of exercise, genetics, and toxins can all increase chronic inflammation, the average American diet, overloaded with trans fats and refined sugars, has become a major culprit. That’s because heavily processed foods are difficult for the body to break down, effectively taxing the immune system. Refined carbs raise blood sugar so quickly that the body can become immune to insulin, which also increases inflammation.

Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Diet promotes internal healing and reduces inflammation systematically. There are five key items in his diet that will have you on the road to optimal health.

Dr. Weil’s five key components to his anti-inflammatory diet are:

  1. Carotenoid-rich Fruits and Vegetables – Some of the best sources of carotenoid include cantaloupe, apricots, sour red cherries, purple passion-fruit, pink and red grapefruit, plantains, mango, guavas, watermelon, papaya, grape leaves, kale, turnip greens, baby carrots, mustard greens, dandelion greens, spinach, romaine lettuce, parsley, and butternut squash. At least 5 daily servings are recommended.
  2. Whole and Cracked Grains - These are grains that are completely intact or only cracked into a few smaller pieces in comparison to finely ground flours. Dr. Weil’s recommendation is to eat 3-5 servings daily of brown rice, groats, barley, quinoa, or basmati rice to name a few options.
  3. Oils Containing Polyphenols - Extra virgin olive oil is the best option for cooking oil in this category but other servings can be made up of nuts or avocados. One teaspoon equals one serving. Consume somewhere from five to seven serving a day.
  4. Fish and Seafood - One serving of fish and seafood equates to four ounces and servings should be limited to two to four every week. Some of Dr. Weil’s recommendations include black cod, herring, sardines, and wild Alaskan salmon. Keep in mind that certain persons might have special dietary limits on the amount of fish or seafood that can be consumed based on age, sex, or woman who are pregnant.
  5. Herbs and Spices - Some of the great ingredients in this category include chili peppers, basil, turmeric, and cinnamon. One of the spices that has been relied on by natural healers for a very long time is turmeric which is used to treat many ailments besides inflammation and include things like migraine headaches. The nice thing about these herbs and spices is that is no limit to the amount that can be consumed.
On top of treating inflammation through diet, what you eat can possibly increase your body’s inflammation response. Some of the foods that should be avoided to stay clear of inflammation include foods that include trans-fats, saturated fats, highly processed foods, large quantities of red meats, high-fat processed meats like sausage and bacon, refined white flours, and foods or beverages containing added sugars.

Sources: USDA, Dr. Oz, HealthMad.com

It’s Friday! Word On The Web

I have decided to test out a new format and make the “Word On The Web” a regular in the Friday time slot. If you have any feedback it would be greatly appreciated. Just leave any feedback in the comments section. So without any further ado, here is this weeks word on the web!

Take the Test to See If You Might Be Considered a “Potential Terrorist” By Government Officials by George Washington on ZeroHedge

A piece that touches on a very serious subject but also was a bit entertaining in my opinion, George Washington himself points out that, “There have been so many anti-terrorism laws passed since 9/11 that it is hard to keep up on what kinds of things might get one on a “list” of suspected bad guys. We’ve prepared this quick checklist so you can see if you might be doing something which might get hassled. The following actions may get an American citizen living on U.S. soil labeled as a “suspected terrorist” today.”

If You Can’t Protect It, You Don’t Own It from The Coming Depression Blog

This almost seems to be a conglomeration of blog posts but I felt that it contained a sizable amount of pertinent information about home defense. The article contains information on security measures in a disaster, the best firearm for a child or first time user, best firearm and pistol for home protection, ammunition selection, assault rifles/long-range weapons, and a few other firearm related topics. I found that the article was thought-provoking and that reading it was time well spent.

21 Facts About America’s Decaying Infrastructure That Will Blow Your Mind from The Economic Collapse Blog

This piece I found very insightful into the problems that our country is facing with our unmaintained infrastructure and the fact that the United States is literally falling apart. The first four sentences of the article really set the tone when they say that, “You can tell a lot about a nation by the condition of the infrastructure.  So what does our infrastructure say about us?  It says that we are in a very advanced state of decay.  At this point, much of America is being held together with spit, duct tape and prayers.”

Gold Is Manipulated (But That’s Okay) from Lew Rockwell by Chris Martenson

Chris Martenson interviews Mat Stein about his book When Technology Fails: A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency and the personal resiliency measures Mat recommends for almost everyone to consider.

Some of the things covered in this interview also cover Mat’s, “universal advice for developing basic preparedness – a 72-hour kit covering the basics needs for living, an emergency plan for your family, lining up local and out-of-town contacts, etc. – and discusses specifics on what gear to procure and steps to take in unexpected emergencies.”

The Natural Route to Pain Relief by Tess Pennington of Ready Nutrition

In this article Tess covers some of the great ways to naturally relieve pain without putting toxins into your body. She’ll ask you if you’ve, “Got a headache?  Here, have some Tylenol! Did you pull a muscle exercising?  Motrin might help! Pain happens, and there’s a pill for nearly every pain. But what happens if the pharmacies are closed? There are other options besides popping a pill – give these methods a try!”

I hope that some of these links are helpful to you or at a minimum provided a new resource for you to find additional preparedness information.

If you have a preparedness link that is useful or a prepping website that you rely on to make sure you are ready for anything, please share it with us!

Every Day Carry Med Kit

It is impossible to always be ready to react to every situation that may occur. If I had a quarter for every time I had gotten a scrape, cut, abrasion, or laceration when I had no way to take care of it, I would at least be able to take my family out to a very nice dinner. The best way that I have found to deal with this is to have what I call a ‘Pocket Medical Kit.’ This basically equates to a kit that is relatively flat that can treat emergent injuries in the form of lacerations, cuts, scrapes, abrasions, etc. Being flat in design allows it to easily fit in a pocket, wallet, or purse and is minimal in weight to the point where you can almost forget that it is there.

The bottom line with your kit is that it should be designed for you and your medical needs. Each individual may face different risks or dangers in their daily lives that may result in the need to custom tailor the contents of their kit to address these concerns. A ‘Pocket Medical Kit’ is designed to address injuries of inconvenience and is not designed to address life threatening injuries. As always, even the best medical kit is not a substitute for good training. If you have the opportunity to obtain medical training, that can often be more useful than the medical supplies themselves. There is no replacement for quality training by qualified personnel. Here are the contents of my kit:

POCKET MEDICAL KIT

1 – 6 Mil Poly Bag (3″X5″) : The contents of the kit will fit nicely into this bag.

1 – Nonadherant Dressing (3” X 4”)

1 – Medical Tape (1”X24″) : Wrap the tape around the poly bag.

1 – Band-Aid (2″X4.5″)

2 – Band-Aids (1″X3″)

1 – Steri-Strip (1/4″)

______________________________________________________________________

What is in your ultra-portable medical kit?

Prepared Ninja Medical Gear Giveaway

The Prepared Ninja is going to try again to give away a Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet (SOFT-T)!!! Every reader is eligible to be entered. Here are the two requirements to be entered for your chance to win:

1. Go to The Prepared Ninja Homepage and subscribe to The Prepared Ninja via email (located at the top of the column on the right hand side).

2. Leave a comment on this post below that lists the item that you lack the most in your medical preps. If you completely lack any medical preps at all, than say so! This SOFT-Tourniquet could be the start you need to put together an awesome medical kit.

(If you are an existing subscriber, you have already been entered automatically for this opportunity!)

******IF THIS GOES WELL, THE PRIZE POT MAY GET SWEETENED!!!******

The Fine Print - In order for this giveaway to happen, The Prepared Ninja must reach 100 email subscribers no later than October 17, 2012 at 11:59 PM EST. That is 30 full days from now. On October 18, 2012, a random number generator will be utilized to determine which of our readers is the lucky winner! *Unfortunately, due to a limited amount of resources, the SOFT-T can only be shipped to a mailing address in the 50 United States, District of Columbia, and Military APO addresses.

DISCLAIMER: The winner of this giveaway is completely and solely responsible for ensuring they are properly trained to use and legally able to possess this piece of medical equipment. The Prepared Ninja and its affiliates are not responsible for illegal possession or misuse of the Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet.

About the SOFT-T from Tactical Medical Solutions:

“The SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is one of the top performing tourniquets currently available. It is the tourniquet of choice for many of the world’s most elite and experienced warriors who have selected it for its outstanding ability to control severe bleeding, high level of reliability and ease of application. While some military units have replaced their issue tourniquets with the SOF®TT, others military units have implemented SOP’s stating that the SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is to be used on all lower extremity bleeds. That means the SOF®TT is the tourniquet that trusted to control the most severe extremity hemorrhage on the battlefield.

The key to successful implementation of a device to be used in a high stress environment is training and ease of use. For law enforcement officers, application of the tourniquet is similar to the use of a hobble. This existing level of familiarity reduces training time and aids in the effectiveness of the device.”

Advantages of the SOF® Tactical Tourniquet
  • 100% Effective. Proven to be 100% effective during US Army Institute of Surgical Research testing.
  • Simple application. The SOF®TT is applied the same to an arm or leg. Unlike other tourniquets that require you to learn two methods of application and implement the proper method when under stress, the SOF®TT is applied the same way to an arm or leg. By accounting for the factors of human performance in combat we have minimized the risk of failure. Applying a tourniquet should not be a multiple choice exam, it should be simple and straight forward. The SOF®TT provides the necessary effectiveness with an unmatched level of simplicity to increase the overall effectiveness of the device.
  • Durability. The SOF®TT is constructed of quality, high strength materials. The tourniquet handle is machined from a solid piece of aircraft aluminum and maintains its strength in extreme temperatures. The tri-rings are molded Acetyl, a high impact plastic that will also maintain its strength in extreme operating conditions.
  • Reliable. The SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is designed to reduce the chance of accidental release or mechanical failure. Unlike other materials including Velcro®, the fastening system will perform when soiled, muddy, frozen, or wet.
  • Safety set screw prevents accidental release of pressure during tactical patient movement. The screw is not required to gain hemorrhage control, but it is recommended if the patient will be moved in a tactical environment.
  • Dual locking rings offer a back up locking system.

Made in the USA.

Sutures, The Megan Fox Of Medical Skills

The ability to suture or “stitch” a wound is considered by many to be one of the “sexiest” skills in the arena of medicine. Using that thought process, we can say that sutures are to medicine as Megan Fox is to actresses. While the skills associated with being able to close a wound can be extremely helpful, what many people don’t realize is that suturing a wound can be deadly in some circumstances. A wound that is closed and leaves a pocket on the inside can essentially just seal infection in the body and ultimately lead to death if not treated properly and quickly. If learning to suture is on your wish list of survival training to acquire, it is imperative that you also know the proper circumstances to not only suture a wound, but when not to suture a wound, what materials to use, and the appropriate technique to use. Now the million dollar question…how do you get all this high tech knowledge?

I recently found the mother of all suturing resources, the Ethicon Wound Closure Manual. For those that are not familiar with the name Ethicon, they are a division of Johnson & Johnson and just happen to manufacture sutures. In my opinion, (for whatever that is worth) that adds a lot of weight to the content of this manual and makes it a must add to your survival library. The information will clarify the myriad of questions that undoubtedly accompany a subject like sutures and suturing. I know that in my case, I have received several hours of formal training on how to suture, when to suture, and what materials to use and this manual still introduced several new key pieces of knowledge to my survival skill set.

Some of the contents of this manual include:

Wound Healing & Management – The Wound, Classifications of Wounds, and Types of Wound Healing

The Suture – What is a Suture?, Personal Suture Preference, Suture Characteristics, Specific Suturing Materials, Common Suturing Techniques, Knot Tying, Suture Removal, Suture Handling Tips, and Suture Selection Procedure

The Surgical Needle – Elements of Needle Design, Principles of Choosing a Surgical Needle, Anatomy of a Needle, Types of Needles, Needleholders, and Needle Handling Tips

Packaging & Topical Skin Adhesives – Suture Preparation, Suture Handling Technique, and Dermabond Skin Adhesive

Other Surgical Products – Adhesive Tapes, Surgical Staples, Looped Suture, and Suture Retention Devices

I think the Wound Closure Manual is just awesome and not just because it covers the art of suturing but because it goes into the science behind when and why sutures are used, the construction of sutures, and how sutures interact with different types of tissue. It seems reasonable to me that even a healthcare professional has the potential to obtain new knowledge through the use of this manual.

The bottom line – use it if you find it useful, pass it along, and don’t forget to save a copy and print it our for your survival library.

Don’t be hesitant to leave a comment or share a story that you have, good, bad, or otherwise about sutures and the importance of having the ability to suture in the event that things go south.

DISCLAIMER: The reader/end user of this information is completely and solely responsible for ensuring they are properly trained to perform these procedures and are also legally able to do so. The Prepared Ninja and its affiliates are not responsible for illegal/improper performance or misuse of the skills covered and/or implied in this blog post.

1st Ever Prepared Ninja Giveaway!!!

The Prepared Ninja is giving away a Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet (SOFT-T)! Every reader is eligible to be entered. Here are the two requirements to be entered for your chance to win:

1. Go to The Prepared Ninja Homepage and subscribe to The Prepared Ninja via email (located at the top of the column on the right hand side).

2. Leave a comment on this post below that lists the item that you lack the most in your medical preps. If you completely lack any medical preps at all, then say so! This SOFT-Tourniquet could be the start you need to put together an awesome medical kit.

(If you are an existing subscriber, you have already been entered automatically for this opportunity!)

The Fine Print - In order for this giveaway to happen, The Prepared Ninja must reach 100 email subscribers no later than August 5, 2012. On August 6, 2012, a random number generator will be utilized to determine which of our readers is the lucky winner! *Unfortunately, due to a limited amount of resources, the SOFT-T can only be shipped to a mailing address in the 50 United State, District of Columbia, and Military APO addresses.

DISCLAIMER: The winner of this giveaway is completely and solely responsible for ensuring they are properly trained to use and legally able to possess this piece of medical equipment. The Prepared Ninja and its affiliates are not responsible for illegal possession or misuse of the Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet.

About the SOFT-T from Tactical Medical Solutions:

“The SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is one of the top performing tourniquets currently available. It is the tourniquet of choice for many of the world’s most elite and experienced warriors who have selected it for its outstanding ability to control severe bleeding, high level of reliability and ease of application. While some military units have replaced their issue tourniquets with the SOF®TT, others military units have implemented SOP’s stating that the SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is to be used on all lower extremity bleeds. That means the SOF®TT is the tourniquet that trusted to control the most severe extremity hemorrhage on the battlefield.

The key to successful implementation of a device to be used in a high stress environment is training and ease of use. For law enforcement officers, application of the tourniquet is similar to the use of a hobble. This existing level of familiarity reduces training time and aids in the effectiveness of the device.”

Advantages of the SOF® Tactical Tourniquet
  • 100% Effective. Proven to be 100% effective during US Army Institute of Surgical Research testing.
  • Simple application. The SOF®TT is applied the same to an arm or leg. Unlike other tourniquets that require you to learn two methods of application and implement the proper method when under stress, the SOF®TT is applied the same way to an arm or leg. By accounting for the factors of human performance in combat we have minimized the risk of failure. Applying a tourniquet should not be a multiple choice exam, it should be simple and straight forward. The SOF®TT provides the necessary effectiveness with an unmatched level of simplicity to increase the overall effectiveness of the device.
  • Durability. The SOF®TT is constructed of quality, high strength materials. The tourniquet handle is machined from a solid piece of aircraft aluminum and maintains its strength in extreme temperatures. The tri-rings are molded Acetyl, a high impact plastic that will also maintain its strength in extreme operating conditions.
  • Reliable. The SOF® Tactical Tourniquet is designed to reduce the chance of accidental release or mechanical failure. Unlike other materials including Velcro®, the fastening system will perform when soiled, muddy, frozen, or wet.
  • Safety set screw prevents accidental release of pressure during tactical patient movement. The screw is not required to gain hemorrhage control, but it is recommended if the patient will be moved in a tactical environment.
  • Dual locking rings offer a back up locking system.

Made in the USA.

Bollocks! I Need Bandages! (And Medical Knowledge)

Medical care can be hard to come by at times when infrastructure is running like a well oiled machine and I can only imagine what access to care may be like in the event of a disaster. The single greatest way to combat a lack of available expertise in the event of a disaster is to expand your knowledge base now, supplemented with adequate supplies. Right! It is just too bad that medical training and supplies are supremely expensive. It is possible though to obtain medical knowledge and medical supplies without any cost to you. Here’s how:

1. Employer Programs – Many employers have a need for employees that have some level of medical training. This could be anywhere from a basic American Red Cross first aid or CPR course all the way up to more advanced skills training like EMT or wilderness medicine courses. Find out if your employer has these types of programs so that you can take advantage of them. If your employer does not offer training opportunities like these, it may be something to bring up as a value to the company in being prepared for an emergency or natural disaster. Of course, when you bring it up, you will want to tell your boss that you are more than willing to volunteer to be the first trainee that the company sends. If you are an employer, consider sending some of your employees to additional training opportunities. It will not only enhance the capabilities of your company but show your employees that you are loyal to them, often resulting in employee loyalty in return.

2. Free Giveaways – We live in the age of online giveaways whether it be a contest put on by a podcast or blog, an essay contest, or a company giving away their products, there are several opportunities that can be taken advantage of for those who are willing to look. 

3. First Aid Supply Companies – If you happen to work at a location that has a first aid kit that is maintained by a first aid supply company, you have the opportunity to get free medical supplies. Like anything in life there are no guarantees but, depending on company policies you may be able to obtain “out of date” or excess medical supplies from the supply company representative. One of the dirty secrets of medical supplies is that they are often good past their expiration date. *I want to be clear that I am not endorsing the use of expired medical supplies. However, if you are able to obtain excess or expired medical supplies, they are always great items to use for medical training. There is always the thought process that something is better than nothing as well if there was a catastrophic medical emergency or a long-term period without access to medical care. 

4. Sales Combined w/ Coupons – There are many coupon websites that will help you match up coupons with the best sales that are going on in stores across the country. One of my favorites is The Krazy Coupon Lady. Armed with this knowledge, you are able to take coupons for first aid items and many times get them for free or dang near it. Some of my scores in the past have included free bandages and individual first aids for less than $0.25.

5. Online Knowledge Sites – There is a wealth of knowledge online for those seeking greater knowledge. Some of the great medical knowledge sites are outlined below:

The following resources are not just available for online expansion of your medical knowledge but are great for adding to your hard copy survival library as well. Enjoy!

Hesperian Health GuidesBooks & Resources

Hesperian offer several downloadable medical and health guides. While I have covered ‘Where There Is No Doctor‘ before, many of what I would consider their premium offerings were highlighted by none other than Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy over at the Doom and Bloom Nation.

Open MichiganUM Medical School

Open source information from the University of Michigan School of Medicine.

Health Sciences OnlineSearch

A comprehensive website that provides searchable health sciences knowledge from over 50,000 learning resources selected from accredited universities, governments, and professional societies.

Mayo ClinicFirst Aid

First aid information to help you during an emergency. Everything from anaphylaxis to toothache.

American Veterinary Medical AssociationFirst Aid Tips For Pet Owners

Pet first aid procedures and medical tips to help you pet at home, on the road, and during a disaster.

WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING!

Reading, reviewing, memorizing, looking at these resources or staying at a Holiday Inn does not qualify you to be a medical professional. The priority here should be to gain the basic knowledge to make life-saving interventions when absolutely necessary without causing further injury or death to your patient. Also, possession of medical supplies and equipment does not equate to having the proper knowledge to use them or legal right to do so. Please consult your local laws and regulations to ensure that you are in compliance with such laws.

WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING! WARNING!

As always, please make sure to pick up the slack and cover anything that I may have missed or add additional comments, questions, or concerns below!

US Army Ranger Medical Kits

OK Folks. This is the last installment of the series that I have been running on the military special operation medical kits. Today will focus on the US Army Ranger Med Kits. I think that the Ranger Med Kits are by design, the best in the business. There is a ton of thought that is put into what goes into each of the Rangers kits and I think it shows. As an Army medic, my aid bag was always modeled after the Ranger aid bags because it was always the logical choice. The approach that is used when designing these kits is to be able to treat all likely battlefield injuries while not adding the extra bulk or weight of extra or unnecessary items. My feeling is that the thoroughness and thought that is utilized for just one component of the medical operations of the US Army Rangers is a testimony of what makes the Rangers such an effective fighting force.

DISCLAIMER: This kit contains items that require a prescription to legally obtain and items that require special training to safely and properly use. This information is provided for educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as any encouragement to obtain any certain piece of equipment for personal or professional use or to attempt any medical protocols or procedures that you are not properly trained and licensed to perform.

 

The packing lists below are intended to be minimum stockage lists for the typical Ranger combat mission. Medics are authorized the flexibility to ADD components to their equipment as based on the mission requirements. Medics are not authorized to deviate from the minimum packing list unless approved by the unit medical director.

RANGER MEDIC RBA/RLCS (Ranger Body Armor/Ranger Load Carriage System) MINIMUM STOCKAGE LIST

The RMED RBA/RLCS packing list are items that the medic carries on his body without opening an aid-bag or rucksack. All items are to be carried in a manner that provides ease of access. The intent of this packing list is to provide all immediate initial care for a trauma casualty without opening external bags and equipment.

1 EA – Ranger Load Carriage System

AIRWAY

1 EA – Cricothyroidotomy Kit

1 EA – Nasophayrngeal Airway 28FR w/ Lubricant

BREATHING

1 EA – 14G, 3.5” Needle

2 EA – HyFin Chest Seal, 6”

2 EA – Asherman Chest Seal

CIRCULATION/BLEEDING

2 EA – Combat Applications Tourniquet (CAT)

2 EA – Emergency Trauma Dressing, 6”

2 EA – Hemostatic Dressing (Chitosan)

1 EA – Hemostatic Bandage (Chitoflex)

4 EA – Kerlex, Vacuum Sealed

FLUIDS/IV ACCESS

2 EA – Saline Lock Kit

1 EA – Sharps Shuttle

MONITORING & DIAGNOSTIC                                               

1 EA – Pulseoximeter, Finger

MISCELLANEOUS

1 EA – Exam Light (Tactical Green)

1 EA – Headlamp

6 PR – Gloves, Exam (Black Talon)

1 EA – Trauma Shears, 7.25”

1 EA – Scissor Leash/Gear Keeper

____________________________________________________________

RANGER MEDIC ASSAULT AID-BAG MINIMUM STOCKAGE LIST

1 EA – AidBag, M-9 (TSS-M-9-RG)

AIRWAY

1 EA – Nasopharyngeal Airway, 28FR w/ Lubricant

1 EA – Cricothyroidotomy Kit

1 EA – King LT-D Supralaryngeal Airway Size 4

1 EA – Suction, Hand-Held (Suction Easy or Squid)

BREATHING

1 EA – 14G, 3.5” Needle

2 EA – HyFin Chest Seal, 6”

2 EA – Asherman Chest Seal

1 EA – Bag-Valve-Mask

CIRCULATION/BLEEDING

2 EA – Combat Applications Tourniquet

3 EA – Emergency Trauma Dressing, 6”

1 EA – Emergency Trauma Dressing, Abdominal

2 EA – Hemostatic Dressing (Chitosan)

2 EA – Hemostatic Bandage (Chitoflex)

3 EA – Kerlex, Vacuum Sealed

1 EA – Tactical Compression Wrap

DISABILITY/IMMOBILIZATION

2 EA – Cravat Bandage, Muslin (or ACE Wrap)

1 EA – Traction Splint (KTD or TTS)

2 EA – SAM Splint II

FLUIDS/IV ACCESS

2 EA – Saline Lock Kit

2 EA – Hextend IV, 500cc

1 EA – Sodium Chloride Flush, 50cc

3 EA – IV Kit

1 EA – FAST-1 Sternal Intraosseous

1 EA – BOA Constricting Band

3 EA – Raptor IV Securing Device

1 EA – Sharps Shuttle Container w/Locking Mechanism

MONITORING & DIAGNOSTIC

1 EA – Stethoscope (Mission Dependent)

1 EA – Pulseoximeter, Finger

MEDICATIONS

1 EA – RMED Medications Kit

EVACUATION EQUIPMENT

1 EA – Hypothermia Kit (Mission and Aid Bag Dependent)

MISCELLANEOUS

1 EA – Exam Light (Tactical Green)

6 PR – Gloves, Exam (Black Talon)

2 RO – Tape, 2”

1 EA – Trauma Shears, 7.25”

1 EA – Scissor Leash/Gear Keeper

MISSION DEPENDENT AID BAG ITEMS

1 EA – Chest Tube Kit

1 EA – SAM Pelvic Sling

1 EA – ACE Cervical Collar

1 EA – Field Otoscope/Opthalmoscope Set

1 EA – Minor Wound Care Kit

1 EA – Glucometer

1 EA – Thermometer, Oral

1 EA – Thermometer, Rectal

____________________________________________________________

RANGER MEDIC MEDICATIONS KIT MINIMUM STOCKAGE LIST (Proficient & Always Carried)

1 EA – Drug case (Otter or Armadillo)

2 EA – Combat Wound Pill Pack

1 EA – Diphenhydramine HCL Inj 50mg (Benadryl)

1 EA – Dexamethasone Inj, 4mg/ml (5ml) (Decadron)

1 EA – Epi-Pen Anaphylaxis Auto-Injector

4 EA – Fentanyl Transmuccosal Lozenge, 800 mcg

2 EA – Ertapenem Inj, 1gm (Invanz)

5 EA – Morphine Sulfate Inj, 5mg

5 EA – Nalaxone Inj, 0.4mg (Narcan)

5 EA – Promethazine Inj, 25mg (Phenergan)

2 EA – Ketorolac Inj, 30mg (Toradol)

25 EA – Acetaminophen Tabs, 500mg (Tylenol)

2 EA – Diazepam Inj, 5mg (Valium)

1 EA – Tubex Injector, Cartridge Unit

5 EA – Syringe, 10cc Luer-Lok Tip

5 EA – Needle, Hypothermic 18G/1.5”

____________________________________________________________

COMBAT WOUND PILL PACK (CWPP) – Carried by Every Ranger

2 EA – Acetaminophen Tabs, 500mg (Tylenol)

1 EA – Moxifloxacin HCL Tab, 400mg (Avelox)

1 EA – Meloxicam, 15mg Tab (Mobic)

_______________________________________________________

SALINE LOCK KIT

2 EA – 18G X 1.5” Catheter/Needle

2 EA – Alcohol Pad

1 EA – Constricting Band, Penrose

1 EA – 2X2 Sponge, Sterile

1 EA – Saline Plug, Locking

1 EA – Syringe, 10cc Luer-Lok Tip

1 EA – 18G X 1.5” Needle, Hypodermic

1 EA – Raptor IV Securing Band

1 EA – Tega-Derm

1 EA – Pill Bag

____________________________________________________________

CHEST TUBE KIT

1 EA – Forceps, 9” Peans

1 EA – Scalpel, #10

1 EA – 36FR Chest Tube

1 EA – Heimlich Valve

4 EA – Sponge, Sterile 4X4

1 EA – Asherman Chest Seal

1 EA – Chux

1 EA – Lidocaine Inj, 1%

1 EA – Syringe, 10cc Luer-Lok Tip

1 RO – Tape, 2”

1 PR – Sterile Gloves

2 EA – 1-0 Armed Suture

2 EA – Petrolatum Gauze

1 EA – Betadine Solution 0.5 oz.

____________________________________________________________

CRICOTHYROIDOTOMY KIT

1 EA – Scalpel, #10

2 EA – Gloves, Exam (Black Talon)

1 EA – Syringe, 10cc Luer-Lok Tip

1 EA – Tracheal Hook (North American Rescue Products)

1 EA – Alcohol Prep Pad

1 EA – Povidone-Iodine Pad

1 EA – Tube, 6mm Bore-Cuffed Cricothyroidotomy

____________________________________________________________

IV KIT

1 EA – IV Solution Set, 10 Drops/ml

1 EA – Saline Lock Kit

1 EA – Tegaderm 4.75” X 4”

____________________________________________________________

MINOR WOUND CARE KIT

4 EA – Pad, Non-Adherent (Telfa)

2 EA – Betadine 0.5 oz.

1 EA – Moleskin, 12”

10 EA – Band-Aids 3” X .75”

5 EA – Steri-Strips

5 EA – Sponge, 4X4 Sterile

2 EA – Scalpel, #10

5 EA – Pad, Povidone

5 EA – Pad, Alcohol

5 EA – Compeed Dressing

5 EA – Tincture of Benzoin Ampule 0.6ml

2 EA – Applicator, Povidone-Iodine

US Air Force Pararescue Trauma Ruck/Vest

This is the second installment on the Pararescue Med Kits for the Air Force. In addition to the primary medical kit that was already covered, PJ’s or Pararescue Jumpers also have Trauma Rucks and Trauma Vests at their disposal. The wide variety of options is no doubt geared to accomodate the many tasks that a PJ could be called to undertake at any time. It seems to me that the trauma vest would obviously be worn while based on the contents of the trauma ruck it seems like something that would be located in a vehicle or aircraft.

DISCLAIMER: This kit contains items that require a prescription to legally obtain and items that require special training to safely and properly use. This information is provided for educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as any encouragement to obtain any certain piece of equipment for personal or professional use or to attempt any medical protocols or procedures that you are not properly trained and licensed to perform.

USAF SOF Trauma Ruck Pack List

2 EA – Carabiner

1 PG – Battery Non-Rechargeable AAA

1 PG – Battery Non-Rechargeable AA

1 PG – Lamp Incandescent 2.5 v

1 EA – Lamp Incandescent .280 Amps

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Red

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Blue

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Green

2 EA – Shield Light, Chemillumenescent

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, IR

10 EA – Naloxone HCL Inj.

144 EA – Lubricant Surgical 5gm

10 EA – Epinephrine Inj. 1ml

1 PG – Diphenhydramine HCL

1 BX – Lidocaine 1% 50 ml

25 EA – Cefazolin Sodium f/Inj. 1gm

12 EA – Sodium Chloride Inj. 1000ml

10 EA – Ketorolac Tromethamine

2 EA – Dressing First Aid

12 EA – Bandage 37x37x52 in

2 EA – Dressing Field 11-3/4 in

4 EA – Dressing First Aid 7.75in

1 PG – Sponge Surgical 4x4in

1 PG – Bandage Gauze 6x180in

1 PG – Pad Isopropyl Alcohol

12 EA – Adhesive Tape Surgical White 1in

4 EA – Adhesive Tape Surgical 3”

12 EA – Bandage Elastic 4.5yds x 6in

1 PG – Applicator Povidone-Iodine

12 EA – Gauze Petrolatum 3x36in

2 EA – Sheet Burn-Trauma 66×99

1 PG – Dressing Occlusive Adhesive

10 EA – Tube Tracheal Disposable 28cm

10 EA – Tube Tracheal 7mm Id

10 EA – Tube Tracheal 32cm Lg

1 PG – IV Injector 78in Long

1 PG – Tube Stomach Surgical 16FR

1 EA – Stylet Cath-Tu Copper

1 EA – Forceps Tracheal Tube Adult

2 EA – Forceps Hemo 8.75-9.25 in

1 EA – Saw Finger Ring 6”Lg

2 EA – Tourniquet Non-Pneumatic 41.5IN

12 EA – Suture Non-Absorbable Surgical Size0

2 EA -  Infusor Blood Col-Dispn

1 PG – Needle Hypodermic 25ga

1 BX – Airway Pharyngeal 100mm

36 EA – Suture Non-Absorbable 4-0

1 PG – Needle Hypodermic 18ga

1 PG – Needle Hypodermic 21ga

10 EA – Tube Drain 36FR

1 EA – Blade Laryngoscope 158mm

10 EA – Valve Surgical Drain 4.5in

1 EA – Stethoscope Combination Adult Size

2 PG – Scissors Bandage7.25”

1 EA – Blade Laryngoscope 130mm

36 EA – Suture Non-Absorbable 3-0

1 EA – Sphygmomanometer

36 EA – Suture Non-Absorbable 5-0

20 EA – Syringe Hypodermic 60cc

12 EA – Airway Nasopharyngeal 28 FR

1 EA – Blade Laryngoscope Adult Size

10 EA – Airway Nasopharyngeal 32FR

1 PG – Catheter Introducer

2 EA – Tourniquet Adult 14×1”

1 PG – Knife General Size 10

1 PG – Gloves Surgical Size 7-1/2

1 PG – Airway Nasopharyngeal 30 FR

1 EA – Handle Laryngoscope

1 EA – Resuscitator Hand-Powered

12 EA – Splint Universal 36×4.5”

12 EA – Airway Nasopharyngeal 26FR

1 PG – Mask/Rebreather Bag Disposable

1 PG – Catheter/Needle 16ga

1 PG – Catheter/Needle 18ga

1 PG – Catheter & Needle 14ga

1 EA – Injector Tube Plastic Reusable

1 EA – Traction Apparatus

1 PG – Syringe Hypodermic 10ml Luer Lock

1 EA – Suction Unit Airway

6 EA – Detector End-Tidal

1 PG  -Tube Drainage

1 EA – Cricothyroidotomy Kit

2 EA – Support Cervical

1 EA – Oximeter Pulse 110/220

1 PG – Container Disposal

1 EA – Litter Poleless Nylon

1 PG – Bag Sterilization

1 EA – Pack Medical Trauma

1 EA – Bag Oxygen Management

1 PG – Goggles Protective

1 SE – Surgical Instrument Set Minor Surgical

2 EA – Snake Bite Kit

1 EA – Test Kit Occult Blood

1 PG – Glove Laboratory

1 EA – Regulator Oxygen Pressure

4 EA – Blanket Casualty OD/Silver

1 BX – Hook Shower Curtain Suspension

1 RO – Tape Pressure Sensitive

1 BX – Bag Plastic Flat 12in

1 EA – Cylinder Oxygen Compressed

USAF SOF Trauma Vest Pack List

1 EA – Black Butt Pack

12 EA – Battery Non-Rechargeable 1.5v

1 EA – Flashlight 3v DC Black

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Red

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Blue

1 BX – Light, Chemilluminescent, Green

6 EA – Dressing First Aid

4 EA – Bandage 37x37x52 in

1 EA – Dressing Field 11-3/4 in

4 EA – Dressing First Aid 7.75iN

1 PG – Sponge Surgical 4x4in

1 PG – Bandage Gauze 6x180in

12 RO – Adhesive Tape Surgical White 1in

4 RO – Adhesive Tape Surgical 3”

10 EA – Bandage Elastic 4in x 4.5yd

12 EA – Gauze Petrolatum 3x36in

2 EA – Tourniquet Non-Pneumatic 41.5IN

1 BX – Airway Oropharyngeal 100mm

1 PG – Scissors Bandage7.25”

12 EA – Airway Nasopharyngeal 28FR

10 EA – Airway Nasopharyngeal 32FR

1 BX – Catheter-Needle 14ga

1 PG – Glove Laboratory

1 EA – Blanket Casualty OD/Silver

1 PG – Clips All Purpose

1 EA – Vest Medical Trauma

1 EA – Belt Individual Equipment

THE NEXT AND LAST INSTALLMENT OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS MEDICAL KITS WILL COME FROM THE US ARMY RANGERS AND SHOULD BE POSTED ON MONDAY IF ALL GOES AS PLANNED. THANKS FOR EXPLORING THE WORLD OF MILITARY OPERATIONAL MEDICINE KITS WITH ME!

US Navy Special Warfare Medical Kit

Today is part three of the military elite medical kit series where I will cover the combat trauma kit that is used by the Navy SEALs. The Navy SEALs are like all of America’s military elite, an outstanding group of warriors. Some of the most heroic accounts that I have read about the war in Afghanistan have revolved around the action of the Navy SEALs. Last year, in cooperation with the best rotary wing pilots in the world, the 160th SOAR (Special Operations Aviation Regiment), and other special operations forces, the Navy SEALs of SEAL Team Six KILLED Osama bin Laden. There is no doubt that some of the SEALs that were on the mission that night were trained in the most advanced operational medicine skills available today and were likely carrying a medical bag that contained some of the items contained in the Naval Special Warfare Combat Trauma Med Kit.

 

DISCLAIMER: This kit contains items that require a prescription to legally obtain and items that require special training to safely and properly use. This information is provided for educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as any encouragement to obtain any certain piece of equipment for personal or professional use or to attempt any medical protocols or procedures that you are not properly trained and licensed to perform.

 

Naval Special Warfare

Combat Trauma Authorized Medical Allowance List

CASE

1 EA – LBT 1468A-Advanced Life Support Combat Medical Bag

PATIENT EXAM/TREATMENT

2 EA – Sets of Exam Gloves

1 EA – Stethoscope

1 EA – Skin Marker

1 EA – Exam Penlight

3 EA – Syringe, Sterile 10cc

2 EA – Syringe, Sterile 5cc

3 EA – Needle, Sterile Disposable 18g

3 EA – Needle, Sterile Disposable 21g

3 EA – Safety Pins, Large

PHARMACEUTICAL

2 EA – Betadine Solution, .5oz Bottle

2 EA – Morphine 10mg/ml, 60mg Injectable

1 EA – Tubex Injector Tube

4 EA – Nalbuphine (Nubain) 20mg/ml, 2ml Injectable

5 EA – Epinephrine 1mg/ml (1:1,000) 1ml

2 EA – Diphenhydramine 50mg/ml, 1ml

5 EA – Water for Injection, 5ml

2 EA – Ceftriaxone (Rocephine) 1g Vial

2 EA – Clindamycin 150mg/ml, 6ml Vial

2 EA – Cefoxitin (Mefoxin) 1g Vial

2 EA – Saline/Heparin Lock Flush Sets*

6 EA – Naloxone (Narcan) .4mg/ml, 1ml

1 EA – Promethazine Injection 25mg/ml, 10ml Vial

INTRAVENOUS AND DRUG THERAPY

1 EA – Hetastarch (Hespan) 500ml

1 EA – Lactated Ringers 500ml (1000ml LR Optional)

2 EA – Macro Drip IV Administration Sets

4 EA – IV Catheter 18g 1 1/4”

2 EA – IV Catheter 16g 1 1/4”

1 EA – IV Catheter 14g 1 1/4”

1 EA – Blood Collection Tourniquet or Penrose Drain

1 EA – Pressure Infuser IV Disposable

2 EA – Luer Lock

2 EA – IV Vein-A-Guard Tape/Opsite

1 EA – IV Stopcock, 3 Way

1 EA – Velcro IV Tourniquet*

AIRWAY

1 EA – Oral Pharyngeal Airway #4

1 EA – Oral Pharyngeal Airway #5

1 EA – Oral Pharyngeal Airway #6

1 EA – Nasopharyngeal Airway # 32 Adult

2 EA – Xylocaine 2% Jelly, 5ml Tube

1 EA – Laryngoscope Handle

1 EA – Laryngoscope Blade Macintosh #3

1 EA – Laryngoscope Blade Macintosh #4

1 EA – Laryngoscope Blade Miller #3

1 EA – Intubation Stylet (14f)*

2 EA – Endotracheal Tube 7.5mm

1 EA – Endotracheal Tube 6.0mm (Cricothyrotomy)*

2 EA – Tongue Blades

TRAUMA

4 EA – Vaseline Gauze 4 x 4”

2 EA – Asherman Chest Dressing

2 EA – Bandage, Cotton, Elastic, Wrap/Ace

4 EA – Bandage 6 Ply x 3 Yds. Kerlix

2 EA – Dressing Field 4” x 7”

1 EA – Dressing Field 7 1/2” x 8”

3 EA – Bandage 37” x 37” x 52” (Cravat)

2 EA – Surgical Blade #10

1 EA – Surgical Blade #11*

2 EA – Gauze Sponges 2” x 2”

4 EA – Gauze Sponges 4” x 4”

1 EA – Adhesive Tape 1”

1 EA – Adhesive Tape 2”

3 EA – Suture 2-0 Nylon Armed With Cutting Needle

8 EA – Alcohol Pads

2 EA – Hemostats, Curved Kelly*

1 EA – 30cc Syringe

1 EA – Trauma Scissors

WATERPROOF BAG

1 EA – LBT1468B-WATERPROOF BAG

COMBAT/JUNGLE LITTER

1 EA – LBT 1681 COMBAT/JUNGLE LITTER 1

(*) Indicates a recommended, but not required to carry item. Note: This is the min. Combat and or Combat training loadout requirements.

 

CHECK BACK TOMORROW FOR EXPANDED COVERAGE OF THE AIR FORCE PARARESCUE MEDICAL KITS.